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Position Statement on Medical Marijuana

03/08/09 | by the professor [mail] | Categories: General, Drug-Regulation Policy

Link: http://AddictionScience.net/ASNmarijuana.htm

The scientific evidence overwhelmingly favors the medical use of marijuana. After ‘sitting on the fence’ for over a decade (i.e., since the beginning of the ASNet), it’s past time to ‘come out of the closet’ (there’s a pun in there somewhere :-/) and endorse the medical use of marijuana. The evidence has been compelling for a long time; in fact, several Presidential Committees spanning several decades have uniformly concluded that there is substantial evidence for medicinal effects from marijuana, and heightened interest in the past decade has prompted considerable study both empirical and theoretical. The overwhelming conclusion remains the same as purported over three decades ago with added emphasis on decriminalizing small quantities of marijuana for personal use.

Click here to listen to a podcast discussing why it's unlikely that medical marijuana will ever be approved in the United States. (length: 24 minutes)

ASNet drug-regulation policy recommendations and interpretations of extant scientific evidence are generally concordant with the major themes adopted by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and by the mainstream medical community except for two prominent issues: the “nicotine addiction” hypothesis” and “medical marijuana.” ASNet strongly disagrees with the assertion that nicotine is a highly addictive substance comparable to cocaine and heroin and that marijuana is similarly addictive. It further advocates the use of marijuana medicinally for appropriate cases and objects to the continued stigmatization and repressive regulation of tobacco products for use by adults. These two discordant positions are not intended to undermine the staunch support ASNet expresses for most NIDA research and policy recommendations: ASNet remains concordant with NIDA on most other issues and continues to respect the many friends and colleagues working for NIDA’s intramural program and those supported by NIDA’s extramural grant program.

The primary reason for remaining silent on these two issues of discordance with the prevailing government opinion is that both positions seem to discredit each other. That is, the pejorative assertions that “not surprisingly ASNet advocates marijuana use because they encourage tobacco smoking too” or “naturally ASNet disagrees with the idea of nicotine addiction because they also recommend marijuana use.” Of course, both statements are false distortions of our actual position. ASNet simply disagrees with the opinion that nicotine is highly addictive like cocaine and heroin and further disagrees with the opinion that marijuana is similarly highly addictive while advocating medicinal use of marijuana. Nonetheless, adopting both of these positions seems mutually discrediting; therefore ASNet has retained a low profile on the “nicotine addiction” issue and has not previously advocated the use of medical marijuana. With this current policy statement, ASNet now ‘steps forward’ and explicitly supports the medical use of marijuana.

We respect the decision displayed by many of our fellow scientists either working for various government agencies or supported by government grants who find it politically inconvenient to similarly ‘come out of the closet.’ Yes, there are many scientists who concur with the ASNet on both of these topics but fear repercussions should they express their opinions publically. And while we refuse to redefine “integrity” to meet the currently popular usage of this term, we do respect their decision to protect and further their careers. (“Integrity” is traditionally defined as “firm adherence to a code of especially moral or artistic values, incorruptibility [Merriam-Webster’s Online Dictionary].”) After all, it’s only tantamount to the Nazi book burning and not really persecuting any specific group of people; or is it?

The ASNet specifically:

(1.) endorses the medicinal use of marijuana for compassionate use including non-terminal but chronic illnesses such as multiple sclerosis, fibromyalgia, and other conditions involving neuropathic pain unresponsiveness to conventional medications,

(2.) firmly disagrees with the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), and other government agencies that purport marijuana to be a highly addictive substance similar to cocaine and heroin (in fact, we consider this assertion to be particularly irresponsible and call upon these government agencies to soften their rhetoric regarding marijuana and to recognize its actual status as a ‘soft drug’),

(3.) supports the decriminalization of marijuana and applauds progressive state legislative bodies such as that seen in our home state of New York who have already de facto decriminalized marijuana, and

(4.) while not advocating the recreational use of marijuana presently withholds opinion on this popular activity.

However, ASNet does not endorse the legalization of marijuana for the reasons outlined in Bozarth (2009).

For more information, check our webpage on medical marijuana.

[Note: The comments regarding the “nicotine addiction” hypothesis were included in the current policy statement only because this view is a matter of public record (e.g., 1994 FDA testimony transcribed in the Federal Record) that could be used to undermine the current advocacy of medical marijuana through ad hominid attack (e.g., “of course they don’t think marijuana is addictive, they don’t think nicotine is addictive either”). That’s right! But ASNet is not currently prepared to debate this second topic further than the public comments already posted on the subject. We feel that opening one ‘can of worms’ at a time is sufficient controversy and distraction from our overall mission. :>]

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