An Addiction Science Network Resource

Illicit Drug Index
Common Street Names of Various Drugs


The following tables cross reference some frequently abused drugs by their generic, trade (commercial, proprietary), and common/street names. For pharmacological classes and DEA Schedules, see Drug Classification. An extensive listing of over 2,000 slang terms for drugs, drug users, and other drug-use related terms can be found at Street Terms: Drugs and the Drug Trade (provided by the Office of National Drug Control Policy). Explanatory text and notes follow the last table.
 
 

Quick Links to Tables

Street Names

Opiate Class Drugs

Depressant Class Drugs

Trade Names

Stimulant Class Drugs

Miscellaneous Drugs

Common Illicit Drug Combinations


 
 

Street Names Listed in Tables

A-E

F-J

K-O

P-T

U-Z

Adam
angel dust
brown sugar
Belushi
buzz bomb
coke
chalk
China girl
crack
crank
crazy coke
crystal
dance fever
diablitos
dreamer
dynamite
downers
ecstasy
eightball
Eve

flamethrower
forget me drug
friend
Frisco special
Frisco speedball
frizzies
Georgia Home Boy
goodfellas
gorilla biscuits
grievous bodily harm
H
H & C
happy sticks
Henry
herbal ecstasy
horse
hows
ice
illies
jet
Jim Jones
juice
junk

king ivory
lace
laughing gas
lib
locker room
love boat
ludes
M
Ma Huang
max
meth
methlies quik
Mexican valium
Miss Emma
missile basing
moonrock
murder one
new ecstasy
oolies
ozone

parachute
PCP
Peter Pan
poppers
primos
rocket fuel
roids
roofies
rush
skag
snow
spaceballs
space base
special K
special K-lube
speed
speedball
T's & blues
torpedo
tragic magic
turbo

uppers
V
vitamin K
wack
west coast
wet
wicky sticks
whippets
woolies
XTC
Zip
zoom

3750s


 
 

Trade Names Listed in Tables

Trade Name

Generic Name

Anadrol 
Android 
Benzedrine
Dexedrine
Dolophine
Durabolin
Duramorph
Halcion
Ketalar
Librium
Methedrine
Nembutal
Oxandrin
Primatene
Ritalin
Rohypnol
Roxanol
Seconal
Sudafed
Valium
Winstrol
Xanax

anabolic steroid
anabolic steroid
amphetamine (racemic)
amphetamine (dextro isomer)
methadone
anabolic steroid
morphine
triazolam
ketamine
chlordiazepoxide
methamphetamine
pentobarbital
anabolic steroid
ephedrine
methylphenidate
flunitrazepam
morphine
secobarbital
pseudoephedrine
diazepam
anabolic steroid
alprazolam


 

Narcotic/Opiate Class Drugs

Generic Name

Trade Name

Common/Street Name(s)

fentanyl

Sublimaze

China girl, dance fever, friend, goodfellas, king ivory

heroin (diacetyl morphine)

none (banned in U.S.)

brown sugar, H, Henry, horse, junk, skag, smack

methadone

Dolophine

frizzies

morphine

Duramorph, Roxanol, generic

dreamer, hows, M, Miss Emma


 
 

Stimulant Class Drugs

Generic Name

Trade Name

Common/Street Name(s)

Psychomotor Stimulants

 

 

amphetamine

Dexedrine, Benzedrine (racemic mixture)

bennies, uppers

cocaine

generic

coke, crank, snow, crack (crystalline free-base form), zip

methamphetamine

Methedrine

chalk, crystal, ice, meth, methlies quik, speed

methylphenidate

Ritalin

uppers, west coast

Mild Stimulants

 

 

ephedrine

contained in various OTC medicines (e.g., Primatene)

herbal ecstasy, Ma Huang 

pseudoephedrine

contained in various OTC medicines (e.g., Sudafed)

 

phenylpropanolamine (PPA)

contained in various OTC medicines (e.g., Dexatrim)

 

Stimulatory Hallucinogens

 

 

MDMA

none

Adam, ecstasy, Eve, XTC

phencyclidine

none

angel dust, crazy coke, gorilla biscuits, ozone, PCP, Peter Pan, rocket fuel, wack


 
 

Sedative-Hypnotic (Depressant) Class Drugs

Generic Name

Trade Name

Common/Street Name(s)

Barbiturates

 

 

secobarbital

Seconal

downers

pentobarbital

Nembutal

downers

Benzodiazepines

 

 

alprazolam

Xanax

 

chlordiazepoxide

Librium

lib

diazepam

Valium

V

flunitrazepam

Rohypnol, Robutal (banned in U.S.)

forget me drug, Mexican valium, roofies, rope

triazolam

Halcion

 

Volatile Anesthetics

 

 

ether

generic; also contained in some consumer products

 

nitrous oxide

generic; also contained in various consumer products

buzz bomb, laughing gas, whippets

Other

 

 

ketamine

Ketalar; mainly veterinary medicine in U.S.

jet, new ecstasy, special K, vitamin K 

methaqualone

Quaalude (banned in U.S.)

ludes


 
 

Miscellaneous Drugs

Generic Name

Trade Name

Common/Street Name

anabolic steroids

Android, Anadrol, Durabolin, Oxandrin, Winstrol

juice, roids

gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB)

none (banned in U.S.)

Georgia home boy, grievous bodily harm, liquid ecstasy, liquid X

nitrites

contained in various consumer products (e.g., air fresheners)

locker room, poppers, rush


 
 

Common Illicit Drug Combinations

Generic Names

Common/Street Name

cocaine & heroin

Belushi, dynamite, eightball, H & C, moonrock, murder one, speedball

cocaine & heroin in tobacco cigarette

flamethrower

cocaine, heroin, & LSD

Frisco special, Frisco speedball

GHB & amphetamine

max

GHB, ketamine, & alcohol

special K-lube

marijuana & crack cocaine

3750s, diablitos, lace, primos, oolies, torpedo, turbo, woolies

marijuana & phencyclidine

happy sticks, illies, love boat, wet, wicky sticks, zoom

marijuana, phencyclidine, & cocaine

Jim Jones

phencyclidine & crack cocaine

missile basing, parachute, spaceballs, space base, tragic magic

pentazocine & tripelennamine

T's & blues


 

Notes

Trade names and common/street names listed above for each compound are exemplary not exhaustive. The tables list some of the more popular drugs and drug combinations, giving examples of common/street names used across different geographic regions. Common/street names for marijuana and the hallucinogens have been omitted.

Trade Names

Some medicinally sold compounds are marketed exclusively by trade names (e.g., diazepam as Valium), while other drugs are sold under their generic names with no current proprietary names in use (e.g., cocaine). Still other drugs employ both generic and proprietary names, depending on the drug manufacturer or distributor (e.g., Duramorph and Roxanol which are brands of morphine, and U.S.P. morphine which is generic).

Common/Street Names

Street names can vary not only across countries but also across regions within the same country or even individual locations in a small geographic region. The specific use of street names sometimes varies over time. For example, "speed" referred almost exclusively to methamphetamine (as opposed to uppers which referenced other amphetamines) during the 1960s, but this term is becoming used increasingly to reference all amphetamine and even non-amphetamine stimulants (e.g., methylphenidate).

Drug Abuse  vs. Drug Addiction

Abused drugs are not always highly addictive drugs. In some cases factors other than drug reinforcement are likely to be important in motivating drug use. When ease of availability is an important determinant of drug use, psychosocial factors are likely to be important mediators. For example, experimental drug use is largely influenced by psychosocial factors and is widespread during adolescence and usually subsides with maturity. Similarly, underlying psychopathology may be an important factor in the adult abuse of some commonly prescribed medications. This does not mean that these compounds lack significant addiction potential, but rather, that most cases of their abuse probably involve experimental or circumstantial drug use not addiction and that cases of true addiction are associated with underlying psychopathology and not simple drug reinforcement. Many of the drugs listed above are prescription drugs that are often abused mainly because of their widespread availability and motivated primarily by psychosocial factors. In fact, prescription drugs are often referred to as "kiddie dope," suggesting that these are not the preferred drugs of hard-core users.


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